Become a Mediator/ADR Neutral

Become a Mediator/ADR Neutral

The NYS-UCS relies on a variety of ADR neutral types to assist the court in resolving the many cases and disputes it sees each year. This includes: Mediators, Arbitrators, and others. These conflict resolution professionals provide an important service to the court system and the thousands of New Yorkers who entrust their case to these neutrals.

Below is an overview of ways people have pursued serving as a neutral both in and out of the courts.
 

Mediator

Within the New York State court system, there are over fifty court mediation rosters that assign mediators to cases like divorce, custody and visitation, personal injury and probate. Eligibility to serve on these rosters is governed by Part 146 of the Rules of the Chief Administrative Judge, which outlines the minimum training and experience required to be on a court roster.

Qualified individuals are invited to complete our online application to mediate for a NYS trial court. 

Outside the court system, opportunities to serve as a mediator include going into private practice, mediating for a private ADR service provider, and volunteering for a Community Dispute Resolution Center (CDRC). 
 

Arbitrator

            Volunteer arbitrators are used by the court in these programs:

Fee Dispute Resolution Program (FDRP)

Small Claims Arbitrators Association

Outside the court system, volunteer arbitrators hear cases as a part of the NYS Attorney General’s Lemon Law Program, which is administered by the New York State Dispute Resolution Association (NYSDRA). Cases are conducted locally through a Community Dispute Resolution Center (CDRC).
 

Other ADR Neutrals

            Other ADR Neutrals used by the court include:

                        -Special Masters

                        -Neutral Evaluators

To learn more about possible opportunities, you may reach out to your local bar association or view upcoming ADR trainings that are being offered.

           

Additionally, Community Dispute Resolution Centers (CDRCs) use a number of process to resolve court and non-court cases.